Dee Dee Warwick

Dee Dee Warwick (September 25, 1945 - October 18, 2008) was an African-American soul singer. Born in Newark, New Jersey as Delia Mae Warrick, she was the sister of Dionne Warwick, niece of Cissy Houston, and cousin of Whitney Houston. Dee Dee Warwick sang with her sister Dionne Warwick and their aunt Cissy Houston in the New Hope Baptist Church Choir in Newark, NJ: eventually the three women formed the gospel trio the Gospelaires who often performed with the Drinkard Singers, Houston being a member of both groups. At a performance by the Gospelaires with the Drinkard Singers at the Apollo Theater in 1959, the Warwick sisters were recruited by a record producer for session work and Dionne and Dee Dee Warwick, along with Doris Troy, subsequently became a prolific New York City area session singing team. ...show more

Dee Dee Warwick (September 25, 1945 - October 18, 2008) was an African-American soul singer. Born in Newark, New Jersey as Delia Mae Warrick, she was the sister of Dionne Warwick, niece of Cissy Houston, and cousin of Whitney Houston. Dee Dee Warwick sang with her sister Dionne Warwick and their aunt Cissy Houston in the New Hope Baptist Church Choir in Newark, NJ: eventually the three women formed the gospel trio the Gospelaires who often performed with the Drinkard Singers, Houston being a member of both groups. At a performance by the Gospelaires with the Drinkard Singers at the Apollo Theater in 1959, the Warwick sisters were recruited by a record producer for session work and Dionne and Dee Dee Warwick, along with Doris Troy, subsequently became a prolific New York City area session singing team.

Dee Dee Warwick began to dabble in a solo career in 1963 cutting what is reportedly the earliest version of You're No Good for Jubilee Records, produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who later recorded Warwick on their own Tiger label with the 1964 single Don't think my baby's coming back. In 1964 Warwick recorded a version of I (Who Have Nothing) for Hurd - although the song's lyric was written by Leiber and Stoller the duo did not participate in Warwick's recording - and Warwick also recorded as a member of Allison Gary And The Burners (as did Cissy Houston) with a release on Royo entitled Darling. Warwick performed on Shivaree which aired July 17, 1965, she sang We're Doing Fine and I Want To Be With You. In 1965 Warwick signed with Mercury Records where she recorded with producer Ed Townsend for their subsidiary Blue Rock label, reaching the R&B Top 30 with We're Doing Fine.

It was on the Mercury label in 1966 that she had her biggest hit with "I Want to Be with You" from the Broadway show Golden Boy, a #9 R&B hit which just missed the pop Top 40 at #41 (Nancy Wilson had reached #54 with her version entitled "I Wanna Be with You" in 1964). The follow-up single was the original version of I'm Gonna Make You Love Me which, peaking at #13 R&B and #88 Pop, was not Warwick's biggest hit but became her best known number by virtue of its later success as a duet between Diana Ross and the Supremes and The Temptations. Warwick continued to record for Mercury through the late 60s. Although her occasional success in the R&B field - notably the 1969 Ed Townsend production of Foolish Fool - was enough for the label wishing to re-sign her in 1970, she signed with ATCO at the invitation of Atlantic Records president Jerry Wexler himself, Wexler having admired Warwick's early session work. ...show less

Albums & Singles by Dee Dee Warwick

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