Seekae

Seekae from Australia came together in 2006, when primary school alumni Alex Cameron and George Nicholas, then fresh out of high school, met again after eight years by chance. Alex introduced George to his then-bandmate John Hassell, and the three, who had all been conducting bedroom experiments with electronic music, decided to start making noise together. In 2008 the group released their debut album 'The Sound of Trees Falling on People' to critical acclaim. Rolling Stone described the record as "an album that's as ambient and mesmerizing as an iced-over forest". ...show more

Seekae from Australia came together in 2006, when primary school alumni Alex Cameron and George Nicholas, then fresh out of high school, met again after eight years by chance. Alex introduced George to his then-bandmate John Hassell, and the three, who had all been conducting bedroom experiments with electronic music, decided to start making noise together. In 2008 the group released their debut album 'The Sound of Trees Falling on People' to critical acclaim. Rolling Stone described the record as "an album that's as ambient and mesmerizing as an iced-over forest".

Along with 5 star reviews, FBI radio crowned the record 'one of Australia's top ten albums of the decade' and listeners also recognised the band at Sydney's Music Arts and Culture Awards as Best Live Act. Seekae spent an incredibly busy few years supporting the praised release, touring heavily with the likes of PVT, Mount Kimbie, Broadcast, Cloud Control, Decoder Ring and the Midnight Juggernauts, as well as selling out their own headline shows. On the 25th March 2011, the band delivered their second offering in the album +Dome. +Dome demonstrated the bands capacity to grow and evolve within their own style, paying homage to the sound and textures of Tokyo, Berlin, Chicago and London, ' Dome' blends live instrumentation with electronics and samples collected over two years of performing, touring and writing.

As noted by Mess and Noise +Dome "a synthesis of the organic and technical [such] that the two become gleefully indistinguishable. Consider the beats; you can never quite tell if they are the product of animal hide or circuitry. Or the way the band have expanded their instrumental palette, with the addition of strings and more developed guitar work, but still couched it in their shining strength - piercing synth lines and dizzying ionic warbles.". ...show less