The Electric Prunes

The Electric Prunes are a psychedelic rock band which formed in 1965 in Los Angeles and are best known for two US Top 40 hits from 1966 - "I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night)" (#11) and "Get Me To The World On Time" (#27) - and the song "Kyrie Eleison" from their 1968 album "Mass in F Minor" which also appears in the 1969 "Easy Rider". The band broke up 1970 but would reunite in 2001. The band's best known lineup consists of Jim Lowe (vocals), Mark Tulin (bass), James Spagnola (guitar), Ken Williams (guitar) and Preston Ritter (drums). The Electric Prunes are a rock band who first achieved international attention as an experimental psychedelic group in the late 1960s, and contributed one track to the soundtrack of Easy Rider. ...show more

The Electric Prunes are a psychedelic rock band which formed in 1965 in Los Angeles and are best known for two US Top 40 hits from 1966 - "I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night)" (#11) and "Get Me To The World On Time" (#27) - and the song "Kyrie Eleison" from their 1968 album "Mass in F Minor" which also appears in the 1969 "Easy Rider". The band broke up 1970 but would reunite in 2001. The band's best known lineup consists of Jim Lowe (vocals), Mark Tulin (bass), James Spagnola (guitar), Ken Williams (guitar) and Preston Ritter (drums). The Electric Prunes are a rock band who first achieved international attention as an experimental psychedelic group in the late 1960s, and contributed one track to the soundtrack of Easy Rider.

After a period in which they had little control over their music, they disappeared for a period of 30 years, reforming as a recording and touring band in 2001. History Origins The group started in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, though during the group's long disbandment, rumors circulated that they were from Seattle, probably because their records were very popular in that city. The first members, Ken Williams (guitar), James Lowe (lead vocal), Michael Weakley (drums) and Mark Tulin (bass) called themselves The Sanctions, and later, Jim and the Lords. Soon, Dick Hargrave joined on organ, but shortly thereafter left to pursue graphic arts.

Their lineup changed many times, including one lineup with Kenny Loggins. Lowe, Tulin, Williams and Weakley were introduced to David Hassinger, then resident engineer at RCA studios, who arranged for them to record some demos at Leon Russell's home recording facility (which he called Sky Hill Studios). Hassinger also suggested they needed a new name. In response, the band produced a long list of suggestions, with The Electric Prunes last as a joke. ...show less